<strong>Central America.</strong></br>Coastal Connections

£10.00

DVD only

Clear

Description

In pre-Colombian times, Native American societies, such as the Maya and the Aztecs, occupied most of the region, now known as Central America. Then came the Spanish expeditions and their conquest of the lands. Spain’s rule over the area lasted for almost three centuries. Nowadays, Central America may mean different things to different people in the world according to the context. In English, Central America is considered a region of the North American Continent. Geographically, it usually comprises seven countries – Belize, Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica and Panama. Mexico, in whole or in part, is sometimes included.

The ‘Coastal Connections’ documentary starts in Mexico, in Acapulco. Following the Pacific coastline south to Guatemala, there is a journey inland to Lake Atitlan, a Mayan Indian word that translates as ‘ where the rainbow gets its colour’. Then there is the Flowers Route in El Salvador; a cycle ride from Amapala around the Honduras Tiger Island. There are excursions to the rim of volcano Masaya and the lovely colonial buildings of Granada in Nicaragua; there is wildlife exploration in Costa Rica and the Embera Indians to meet in Panama. The documentary covers the passage through the Panama Canal, first opened to shipping in 1914. There are journeys to visit the colourful Kuna Indians on Panama’s San Blas Islands and the peoples of the Corn Islands of Nicaragua. After exploring the ancient Mayan sites of Copan in Honduras and Tulum in Mexico, finally, there is a visit to Uxmal that must be one of the most attractive archaeological sites in the Yucatan.

JOHN MYERS PHOTOGRAPHIC visits all seven countries in Central America, and several fascinating ancient sites in the Yucatan state of Mexico. There are fantastic images, encapsulating the enticing atmosphere of the region, and the customs, cultures and colour of the local people and their environment.

Running time is approximately 50 minutes.

Tags: Central America, North America